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At roughly the same latitude as the
Orkneys, the 4500 sq miles of Glacier
Bay in SE Alaska is a tiny part of the
state, yet it gets a disproportionate
numbers of visitors, mainly on tour
boats. But there's little to see now: in
1977, when our expedition was there,
16 tide-water glaciers discharged
millions of tons of ancient ice into the
Bay, and the calving process was a
spectacular sight as 200ft-high columns of ice crashed into the water. Now, with the
retreat of the glaciers due to global warming, they've all grounded out, and calving
onto dry land just isn't the same. Having only a small inflatable with an outboard
(and not even that sometimes when it broke down, or, as on one occasion, when the
boat was carried off by an iceberg overnight), we had to be particularly careful of
'growlers' like the one here, young icebergs that are unstable enough to split and roll
over, taking you with them if you're near. But the smaller pieces were a good source
of 10,000 yr-old ice for your whisky, if you had any.
At roughly the same latitude as the Orkneys, the 4500 sq miles of Glacier Bay in SE
Alaska is a tiny part of the state, yet it gets a disproportionate numbers of visitors,
mainly on tour boats. But there's little to see now: in 1977, when our expedition was
there, 16 tide-water glaciers discharged millions of tons of ancient ice into the Bay, and
the calving process was a spectacular sight as 200ft-high columns of ice crashed into the
water. Now, with the retreat of the glaciers due to global warming, they've all grounded
out, and calving onto dry land just isn't the same. Having only a small inflatable with an
outboard (and not even that sometimes when it broke down, or, as on one occasion,
when the boat was carried off by an iceberg overnight), we had to be particularly careful
of 'growlers' like the one here, young icebergs that are unstable enough to split and roll
over, taking you with them if you're near. But the smaller pieces were a good source of
10,000 yr-old ice for your whisky, if you had any.
At roughly the same latitude as the
Orkneys, the 4500 sq miles of Glacier Bay
in SE Alaska is a tiny part of the state, yet it
gets a disproportionate numbers of
visitors, mainly on tour boats. But there's
little to see now: in 1977, when our
expedition was there, 16 tide-water
glaciers discharged millions of tons of
ancient ice into the Bay, and the calving
process was a spectacular sight as
200ft-high columns of ice crashed into the water. Now, with the retreat of the glaciers
due to global warming, they've all grounded out, and calving onto dry land just isn't the
same. Having only a small inflatable with an outboard (and not even that sometimes
when it broke down, or, as on one occasion, when the boat was carried off by an iceberg
overnight), we had to be particularly careful of 'growlers' like the one here, young icebergs
that are unstable enough to split and roll over, taking you with them if you're near. But
the smaller pieces were a good source of 10,000 yr-old ice for your whisky, if you had any.

Wachusett Inlet

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At roughly the same latitude as the Orkneys, the 4500 sq miles of Glacier Bay in SE Alaska is a tiny part of the state, yet it gets a disproportionate numbers of visitors, mainly on tour boats.  But there's little to see now: in 1977, when our expedition was there, 16 tide-water glaciers discharged millions of tons of ancient ice into the Bay, and the calving process was a spectacular sight as 200ft-high columns of ice crashed into the water.  Now, with the retreat of the glaciers due to global warming, they've all grounded out, and calving onto dry land just isn't the same.  Having only a small inflatable with an outboard (and not even that sometimes when it broke down, or, as on one occasion, when the boat was carried off by an iceberg overnight), we had to be particularly careful of 'growlers' like the one here, young icebergs that are unstable enough to split and roll over, taking you with them if you're near.  But the smaller pieces were a good source of 10,000 yr-old ice for your whisky, if you had any.
mh203 Storm brew, Alaska
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