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All papers, inks and mount-board materials are of conservation grade.
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I was expecting great things of the
biggest boatyard on Giudecca, the large
island on the 'other' side of the Grand
Canal from where most visitors view
Venice. But I was disappointed - it was
mostly given over to the sorts of plastic
craft that you can see in any marina
anywhere in the world. I was expecting
a scruffy yard where scruffy
carpenters and grease monkeys
laboured over broken gondolas,
worn-out traghettas, vaporettos and
speed boats. But only one gondola was
being repaired at the time, although
that appeared to be more abandoned
than anything else. It's more likely that
they are repaired or maintained in the
small workshops scattered throughout
Venice where they're actually built, and
I didn't have the time or the contacts
to go seeking them out. But this pleasingly simple composition caught my eye, the
rudder on the back of a small barge-like boat, the like of which I'd never seen on any
of the canals of Venice (or, at least, not in daytime: in the early hours all sorts of
wonderful craft run supplies into the Venetian shops and businesses, a different world
that most visitors don't get to see).
I was expecting great things of the biggest boatyard on Giudecca, the large island on the
'other' side of the Grand Canal from where most visitors view Venice. But I was
disappointed - it was mostly given over to the sorts of plastic craft that you can see in
any marina anywhere in the world. I was expecting a scruffy yard where scruffy
carpenters and grease monkeys laboured over broken gondolas, worn-out traghettas,
vaporettos and speed boats. But only one gondola was being repaired at the time,
although that appeared to be more abandoned than anything else. It's more likely that
they are repaired or maintained in the small workshops scattered throughout Venice
where they're actually built, and I didn't have the time or the contacts to go seeking
them out. But this pleasingly simple composition caught my eye, the rudder on the back
of a small barge-like boat, the like of which I'd never seen on any of the canals of Venice
(or, at least, not in daytime: in the early hours all sorts of wonderful craft run supplies
into the Venetian shops and businesses, a different world that most visitors don't get to
see).
I was expecting great things of the biggest
boatyard on Giudecca, the large island on the
'other' side of the Grand Canal from where
most visitors view Venice. But I was
disappointed - it was mostly given over to the
sorts of plastic craft that you can see in any
marina anywhere in the world. I was expecting
a scruffy yard where scruffy carpenters and
grease monkeys laboured over broken
gondolas, worn-out traghettas, vaporettos
and speed boats. But only one gondola was
being repaired at the time, although that
appeared to be more abandoned than
anything else. It's more likely that they are
repaired or maintained in the small workshops
scattered throughout Venice where they're
actually built, and I didn't have the time or the
contacts to go seeking them out. But this
pleasingly simple composition caught my eye,
the rudder on the back of a small barge-like
boat, the like of which I'd never seen on any of the canals of Venice (or, at least, not in
daytime: in the early hours all sorts of wonderful craft run supplies into the Venetian shops
and businesses, a different world that most visitors don't get to see).

In a Venice boatyard

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I was expecting great things of the biggest boatyard on Giudecca, the large island on the 'other' side of the Grand Canal from where most visitors view Venice. But I was disappointed - it was mostly given over to the sorts of plastic craft that you can see in any marina anywhere in the world.  I was expecting a scruffy yard where scruffy carpenters and grease monkeys laboured over broken gondolas, worn-out  traghettas,  vaporettos  and speed boats. But only one gondola was being repaired at the time, although that appeared to be more abandoned than anything else.  It's more likely that they are repaired or maintained in the small workshops scattered throughout Venice where they're actually built, and I didn't have the time or the contacts to go seeking them out.  But this pleasingly simple composition caught my eye, the rudder on the back of a small barge-like boat, the like of which I'd never seen on any of the canals of Venice (or, at least, not in daytime: in the early hours all sorts of wonderful craft run supplies into the Venetian shops and businesses, a different world that most visitors don't get to see).
Venetian rudder_b
World gallery
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