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No, it's not a scene from 'Don't Look Now',
but a scene from every mother's nightmare -
the kid running loose in slippery conditions
next to a fountain. This one's in Moscow, but
I've long forgotten whereabouts except that it
was in a park somewhere fairly close to Red
Square. In everything I'd read about the
Russian capital, the streets were gloomy,
imposing architecture gave it an austere,
forbidding look and the people were dour,
unfriendly and stolid. That's not the Moscow
that I saw, even though I mainly saw the place
through a terrible hangover. I felt an almost
holiday atmosphere, there was much to
admire in the architecture (and quite a lot of
it from the Art Deco era, which was a
surprise) and the streets buzzing with life.
Maybe a massive clean-up campaign had
brightened everything up, but I found the
Kremlin - at least the bits you can see of it from Red Sq. - and the Lubyanka, the
infamous NKVD prison, to be the most distinctive 'buildings' in a fascinating city. I say
'buildings', but the Kremlin is a vast collection of state and religious buildings, a
state-within-a-state, that in earlier times kept the whole of Moscow safe behind those
massive walls.
No, it's not a scene from 'Don't Look Now', but a scene from every mother's nightmare -
the kid running loose in slippery conditions next to a fountain. This one's in Moscow, but
I've long forgotten whereabouts except that it was in a park somewhere fairly close to
Red Square. In everything I'd read about the Russian capital, the streets were gloomy,
imposing architecture gave it an austere, forbidding look and the people were dour,
unfriendly and stolid. That's not the Moscow that I saw, even though I mainly saw the
place through a terrible hangover. I felt an almost holiday atmosphere, there was much
to admire in the architecture (and quite a lot of it from the Art Deco era, which was a
surprise) and the streets buzzing with life. Maybe a massive clean-up campaign had
brightened everything up, but I found the Kremlin - at least the bits you can see of it from
Red Sq. - and the Lubyanka, the infamous NKVD prison, to be the most distinctive
'buildings' in a fascinating city. I say 'buildings', but the Kremlin is a vast collection of
state and religious buildings, a state-within-a-state, that in earlier times kept the whole
of Moscow safe behind those massive walls.
No, it's not a scene from 'Don't Look Now', but a
scene from every mother's nightmare - the kid
running loose in slippery conditions next to a
fountain. This one's in Moscow, but I've long
forgotten whereabouts except that it was in a
park somewhere fairly close to Red Square. In
everything I'd read about the Russian capital, the
streets were gloomy, imposing architecture gave
it an austere, forbidding look and the people were
dour, unfriendly and stolid. That's not the
Moscow that I saw, even though I mainly saw the
place through a terrible hangover. I felt an almost
holiday atmosphere, there was much to admire
in the architecture (and quite a lot of it from the
Art Deco era, which was a surprise) and the
streets buzzing with life. Maybe a massive
clean-up campaign had brightened everything up,
but I found the Kremlin - at least the bits you can
see of it from Red Sq. - and the Lubyanka, the
infamous NKVD prison, to be the most distinctive 'buildings' in a fascinating city. I say
'buildings', but the Kremlin is a vast collection of state and religious buildings, a
state-within-a-state, that in earlier times kept the whole of Moscow safe behind those
massive walls.

A Moscow fountain

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No, it's not a scene from 'Don't Look Now', but a scene from every mother's nightmare - the kid running loose in slippery conditions next to a fountain. This one's in Moscow, but I've long forgotten whereabouts except that it was in a park somewhere fairly close to Red Square. In everything I'd read about the Russian capital, the streets were gloomy, imposing architecture gave it an austere, forbidding look and the people were dour, unfriendly and stolid. That's not the Moscow that I saw, even though I mainly saw the place through a terrible hangover. I felt an almost holiday atmosphere, there was much to admire in the architecture (and quite a lot of it from the Art Deco era, which was a surprise) and the streets buzzing with life. Maybe a massive clean-up campaign had brightened everything up, but I found the Kremlin - at least the bits you can see of it from Red Sq. - and the Lubyanka, the infamous NKVD prison, to be the most distinctive 'buildings' in a fascinating city. I say 'buildings', but the Kremlin is a vast collection of state and religious buildings, a state-within-a-state, that in earlier times kept the whole of Moscow safe behind those massive walls.      
mh306 In Moscow_b
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